Hints & Tips

Starting hand quilting: Part 5: Equipment, Needles & Thimbles

Needles The type of needle you use for hand quilting depends on which stitching technique you use. I stitch in the traditional way using the “rocking stitch”. More details about how to do this will be in the last post of this series, but you can see a short video of me stitching using this…

Mending

I showed you a couple of my jackets. I recently noticed quite some wear and tear on some of them. Not too strange when you take into account they were made in the early 2000s. It’s mainly the silk parts that are deteriorating, probably from laundering but also from simply wearing. Here you can see…

Starting hand quilting: Part 4: Equipment: Hoops and Frames

What equipment do you need to start hand quilting? Well, there are lots of different views on this, so I will share what works for me. Hoops 14″ quilting hoop, bound with tape I prefer to use a hoop to hold the part of my quilt that I am working on. The best hoop to…

To Label or Not to Label, That is the Question!

When I first started to learn P&Q my teacher at the time, who was not the ‘usual’ P&Q teacher I now realise, did recommend labelling your quilts and I have to say I agree with her. (Thanks, Barbara for getting me started!) ‘Why?’ You may ask. Firstly, it records who made the quilt. ‘But I…

Skimpy seams

That moment when you are pressing a quilt top – from the back – removing stray threads and preparing to layer it up for quilting . . . and you find a seam that is hanging on by a few threads. What to do? There’s no way you can re-stitch it without distorting that part…

Starting hand quilting: Part 3: Threads

While it is possible to use all sorts of threads for hand quilting, which is the best, and why? There are two things to consider: What will the finished appearance be like? How easy will the thread be to use? Both of these things are, of course important! Most people start off thinking about the…

But is it flat? ….. How to block a quilt.

Blocking a quilt is a bit like blocking an embroidery or a jumper. You do it to help the fibres settle into the shape that you want. Quilts are just much bigger and you need to have the space to do it. I always block wallhangings and cot quilts on my design board. If I’m…

Starting hand quilting: Part 2: Wadding

How do you start hand quilting? This webpage will discuss the types of wadding (batting in the USA) that you will need. The thickness and the density of the wadding makes an enormous difference to the ease of the quilting, and also to the finished appearance. Feathered heart design using high loft wool wadding Feathered…

Drafting, Making and Using Templates

There are many reasons for needing to make templates for cutting shapes. Some shapes simply cannot be easily cut with a rotary cutter and although you can buy acrylic templates for many of these shapes it can get a bit expensive as you need a separate template for each size. Sometimes you may want to…

Starting hand quilting: Part 1: Fabric

Hand quilting is relaxing to do (once you have got the hang of it!), and gives beautiful results, which are different to those obtained by a sewing machine. Maybe you would like to try it, but are not sure where to start? This is the first in a series of blog posts, in which I…

How to draft a block

Where to start?! In my last blog about re-creating a quilt I looked at the stars quilt I had made using lots of left-over bits and explained how you could deconstruct it to work out how it might have been made. I lightly tossed in words like ‘Variable Star’, ‘Sawtooth Star’ and ‘Ohio Star’ and…

When You Find A Hole In Your Seam

You’ve spent ages piecing your quilt top and the excitement mounts as all your blocks form into rows and then one big quilt top.  You stand back to admire your work and you can’t wait to move onto layering it up ready for quilting.  To get the full effect, you take your completed top to…

Drafting Cable Borders

Cables are a popular choice of quilting design for borders and come in various widths and styles. Where would you start to plan a cable border for your latest quilt? Stencils are widely available, but they are often not the correct size for your borders- so unless you were incredibly organised, and designed your quilt…

Heart templates

Hearts are an ever popular motif. It’s easy to cut out a template yourself in a variety of styles that you could use for applique or for quilting designs. Watch this short video, or follow the instructions below: Drawing a regular heart shape Take a piece of paper a little larger than the desired motif,…

My Top Tips for Buying A New Sewing Machine

One of the most often asked questions I’ve seen in sewing and quilting groups has been about sewing machines and which one people should buy.  As I’ve been wanting to upgrade my sewing machine for some time I followed these conversations with interest and I’ve come up with my Top Tips that may just help…

Why won’t it fit……….?  Part 2 Square-in-a-Square.

A common patchwork unit where getting a good line up can be tricky is the “Square-in-a-Square” unit. Four triangles are sewn around a central square. It should finish as shown in the photo above, with enough of the triangle fabric remaining all round to leave a quarter inch seam allowance beyond the points of the…

How to ‘read’ a quilt

We’ve all been there – you see a quilt in a show, on Facebook or Instagram, on the cover of a magazine and think “I’d like to make one like that, but how has it been done?”. At a show, with the quilt in front of you, it can be easier to work out than…

Why You Should Practice Free Motion Quilting Before Every Project

When we are busy making, taking time to practice different techniques can sometimes go to the back of the queue, we are just so intent on getting finished. Recently, I was doing a photo quilt and was so pleased I took the time to do some practice before moving onto the quilting. It saved me…

HINTS AND TIPS – Terms used in Patchwork and Quilting

This list assumes some basic knowledge of fabric, sewing and sewing machines. It is not exhaustive but is intended to be useful for those just starting out on Patchwork and Quilting. PATCHWORKING (verb) The joining together of pieces of fabric by either hand or machine sewing to make larger pieces of fabric. The fabric used…

Removing the Centres of Shapes and Letters for Appliqué

In the previous video I shared about appliqué I mentioned that I’d share how to remove the centres from shapes and letter. By leaving the shape whole until after attaching to fabric makes things a lot easier as it is not so fragile. Please bear in mind, there is more than one way to do…

Appliqué-Take time to stop and think

How many times have you gone to attach your appliqué pieces to find they are the wrong way?  Hopefully, this video will help.     Related posts: Removing the Centres of Shapes and Letters for Appliqué What to do with orphan blocks Why You Should Practice Free Motion Quilting Before Every Project Ring Pincushion 

Gutermann Thread set review and a make!

After my previous review of Guterman threads (see here), I was very happy to review this new pack, as I knew how much I like their threads. As with the last thread set, I reviewed there were 10 threads in the pack, but this time it had a rather intriguing metal template! When it arrived,…

Why won’t it Fit….? Part 1 Flying Geese

Once you move on from simple squares to more interesting patchwork designs, you may run into a few problems when stitching smaller units together into a block. For example, have you ever joined a square to a Flying Geese unit, and wondered why the square is sticking out at the bottom…….? It’s tempting at this…

Light, medium or dark?

How can you tell which fabrics are ‘light’, which are ‘medium’ and which ‘dark’, let alone ‘light-medium’ or ‘medium-dark’ or any of the other variations you may have come across? If you are using a monochrome range of fabrics then this may be fairly easy – in both the green Trip Around the World and…

What to do with orphan blocks

I hate anything going to waste and that included patchwork blocks.  When I was doing some pattern testing for the Sew A Row Fire Quilt, I ended up with two blocks that weren’t used.  They’d been sitting in the bottom of the box and I just had to do something with them.  I couldn’t let…

Another take on a Thread Catcher

I have made several Thread Catchers over the past years and non of them have been that successful. When I saw this idea on the main Facebook page, I just had to make one….. it is really cheap, and easy to make and it works!   I asked Yvonne Kearton if I could ‘steal’ her…

Does the Pfaff inbuilt IDT make a difference to our sewing?

From time to time our UKQU Website shop owners offer valuable advice for us.   Stephen from Aberdeen Sewing Machines has this for us all this week to explain an important aspect of sewing machine technology.  [and there’s a flash sale over at their website too for their Pfaff machines.. you heard it first here]. Why IDT? One of…

Let’s Talk About WIPs

Let’s talk about WIPs baby, let’s talk about UFOs, let’s talk about all the projects, that are lurking in bo-xes, let’s talk about WIPS!…….or, that’s how I imagine Salt ‘n’ Pepa would have sung it if they had been quilters 😉. In any case, in some circles Wips (Works in Progress) or UFOs (Un-Finished Objects)…

The Cheap Procrastinator: Hints and Tips from a Hospital Bed – A4 Presentation Portfolio Folder.

Introducing Denise .. our vlogger .. direct from her hospital bed no less.   This girl means business!   Related posts: The Cheap Procrastinator – All the small things you can do; Boro Part Two The Cheap Procrastinator – All the small things you can do; Boro The Cheap Procrastinator – Boro, Boro, Bin it, Threads…

String Piecing blocks – how to avoid mistakes!

Have you ever stitched the pieces of your block together, looked at it, and wondered why it doesn’t look right? When assembling blocks, the small units are assembled into rows first, and the rows are then joined together. You have probably turned one of the small units (or even a whole row) around while doing…

A paper frame

I’m making two postcards, and it’s hard to see how they’ll work out: So, I cut out a 6×4-inch window to get a better idea before I go any further: It helps me to visualise how it will turn out. It’s simple, but it works:) Related posts: Tips for Adding Simple Borders by Quilt Sandwich…

Travel Sewing Tips

The sun is shining as I write and holidays are approaching. I sew virtually every day and when going on holiday I just can’t go without taking something with me be it a little kit or a full project. But how to take your fabrics and notions without packing way too much? Something I’ve been…

Rotary cutting

I’ve just been cutting rather a lot of strips all the same size to make a mini Bargello and I thought it might be helpful if I showed you how I manage to remember to place the ruler in the right place each time. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve miscut because…

How To Add a ‘Magic’ Binding

Hi, I’m Devi and have been invited to contribute a blog or tutorial. This blog/tutorial first appeared on my website at the end of last year and may have been seen by a few of you already.  Since writing it people with far more experience of quilting that I have told me that the method…

Which Bobbin Thread 

From time to time we post information from the manufacturers and distributors.   This article is taken from Barnyarns own website.  As you might be aware, they are a regular supporter of our website, and usually seen on the exhibition circuit where you can chat with Callum and the team.     Even better, there’s a UKQU.co.uk discount…

cut&alter :: A use for your selvedges

The funny thing about things that you know is that you think everyone else know them too! Last week I packaged and sent of some wadding to a fellow blogger and when it arrived she got in touch to say what a great idea it had been to tie it up with a selvedge and…

How to trace a design onto difficult fabric

Did you ever wanted to stitch something onto your work, but needed the guidance of a drawn line and didn’t know how to get the lines onto a fabric? There are lots of tools and pens which you can use to mark your fabric, but sometimes it’s difficult to mark dark fabric or you may…

Perfect Circles!!

Whilst making the circles for my Sample Block Quilt – I was having trouble needle turning the edge of my central circles. I was trawling through the ‘net’ and came across this suggestion.  I thought it was clever – what do you think?? Using a piece of kitchen foil about 1inch bigger in diameter than…

Pressing for Perfect Point: Part 2: Triangles

Perfect points make your patchwork look so great. It’s what we all want, but how do you achieve it? Read on – and download a free summary or a free one-page try-out pattern if you would like to keep this for future reference. Catherine Wheel – pattern available from my Shop Pressing diagonal seams It…

Mixed bag of Questions and Answers

Been asked a lot of questions over a Bloggerati and thought this is as good as place as any to answer them all, as most don’t require a lengthy and boring answer, I’ve decided to do them all in one go as I don’t think there would be enough to make several blogs or hints…

Bobbin Along

Let’s talk bobbins….unfortunately one size doesn’t fit all, so here’s the most common ones used along with a few odd ones at the end!                    One of the most common used. For front loading machines like Janome, Brother and Toyota.              …

What size do I cut Diamond-in-a-Square units?

This unit is sometimes called Diamond in a Square as it essentially a square, turned on point (hence ‘diamond’) inside another square. It is found in a wide variety of blocks, usually in the corners or the centre, and is useful as a ‘spacer’ block between busier blocks and as a border unit – either…

READY  WOUND  BOBBINS

  Have you ever started sewing together your quilt only to get cracking and then run out of thread on the bobbin?  Then you have to unthread the machine to load another bobbin, rethread the machine and off you go again. Well, to stop this from happening, I load 4/5 bobbins at a time and…

Get to the point!

Always a good idea to have the right needle for the job, nothing worse than starting a project and the material is snagging, machine may make a thudding type noise, change that needle! We always recommend Schmetz needles over any other brand as they go through more than others in the  manufacturing processes. The difference…

Hand quilting – the Rocking stitch

The Rocking stitch is the most common method of hand quilting, and once mastered produces beautiful results. If you are struggling to produce neat even stitches, then watch how Carolyn Gibbs breaks the process into steps in this short video.   It does take practice – see how Carolyn’s stitches improved on the first project…

The Ultimate Wadding Guide: Sizing

  Wadding comes in all shapes and sizes; by the roll, by the metre, pre-cut, cot, queen, king… In this post I am breaking it all down to help ensure you get the correct sized wadding (or batting to those from the US) for your project. I will look at how to work out how…

Getting Out of the Starting Blocks part one

For those of you completely new to patchwork and quilting perhaps you might be interested in how to get started with the very basics. I am rather new myself so it’s all fresh to me and I’ve learned what it’s possible to do with simple tools. At the beginning you just don’t know if you…

Best Foot Forward Part 4

And finally, some lesser known sewing machine feet to complete my short series. Lo shank straight stitch only, teflon foot. Straight and zig zag teflon foot. My four part series has covered the more common feet used,and whilst some are generic, here are certain machines, like the Bernina ranges, that will only work with their…

Best Foot Forward Part 3

Continuing my series demonstrating the sewing machine feet your might own, I am sure you will be familiar with the walking foot, but have you ever used a roller foot? Generic Walking foot with quilting guide. My favourite looking foot! Roller foot for difficult surfaces like rubber and leather. Piping foot for overlocks. Seems I’ve…

Best Foot Forward Part 2

In part two of my four part series I have shown you the more unusual feet and these might be less familiar to a quilter, but more useful to a dressmaker .. like the specialist concealed zipper foot Adjustable screw on zip and piping foot. Adjustable concealed zipper foot. Overlocking foot. More on Part 3…

Best Foot Forward Part 1

Have you ever wondered what all those feet that come along with your new sewing machine are used for.   My ‘day job’ when I am not browsing around this website, is a sewing machine engineer, and there are not many female engineers around either.      I have put together a four part guide to…

What to do with scraps?

I don’t know about you, but I hate throwing anything away in my sewing room. Snippets of thread, yarn, and fabric must have a useful purpose, but what do you do with them? Do you have uses for them, or do you find it easy to let go? For several years now, I have a…

Looking for a machine?

So you’ve decided to get a new/used machine that you want to last the test of time, hopefully I can provide you with some tips on what to look out for and avoid any bad buys! Firstly, avoid the plastic chassis and plastic framed machines usually “pile em high, sell em cheap” ones often found…

Cutting Flying Geese

There is a ‘formula’ for virtually every shape we need to cut for patchwork. Hopefully the following will help you to work out how to rotary cut Flying Geese. Finished size – this is the size of the unit/piece once it is stitched into the block/quilt. Rounding up to the nearest ⅛ inch. If you…

On-Point Settings

Most quilts are ‘straight set’ – that is the blocks are set square to the edges of the quilt; sometimes there are sashing strips between the blocks, sometimes not. Sashing strips can make a quilt larger and they can also act as coping strips when pieced individually around each block as they enable you to…

The Ultimate Wadding Guide: Materials

In this second installment of The Ultimate Wadding Guide I will be discussing the different materials used in the amazing array of waddings that are available to us. In order to help you decide which material is perfect for your project, I will be looking at the pro’s and con’s of each material, splitting them…

The Ultimate Wadding Guide: Glossary

Wadding – it’s the bit you don’t see, but your choice of wadding for your patchwork project can have a big impact on how it finally looks when quilted and then as it is washed over time. When you have spent hours selecting the fabrics and weeks (or months.. maybe years..) constructing the quilt, it…

In a Nutshell – Appliqué 

APPLIQUÉ The technique of applying one or more fabrics to a background with hand or machine stitching. Always use a thread to match the colour of the shape to be appliquéd. Hand appliqué Also known as needle turn appliqué. The appliqué pattern can be traced onto the background fabric or an overlay method can be…

Sewing Needle AdvicePart three ..  What size needle to use and when

In this final part of our short series on Sewing Needles Jon and Callum talk about which are the best Schmetz needles to use for different fabrics or specialist sewing. If we are to improve our technique and get the best results from our efforts then using the correct needle for the job is equally…

English Paper Piecing: What stitch should I use?Duck Creek Mountain Quilting

This is the third post in my series about EPP. This is looking at the type of stitch you might want to use to join your pieces. Traditionally EPP uses a whip stitch, but there are now many alternatives and it’s really about personal choice and what works best for you. What you want is…

Flying Geese

You’ve seen a lovely quilt you would like to make; you have managed to break the design down and seen it is made from a number of Flying Geese units. But what size? Flying Geese units are traditionally made one at a time by stitching two small half-square triangles to the shorter sides of one…

In a Nutshell – Pressing

When piecing fabrics, it is essential to press each seam as it is stitched. Firstly, press the seam flat on the wrong side before opening the pieces, to set the stitches. Left hand block has had first press Then, on right side of the fabric, press both seams towards the darker fabric using tip of…

Sewing Needle Advice – Troubleshooting

In part one of this occasional article Jon and Callum from Barnyarns introduced the basics about Schmetz needles. But what if something is not going quite right. Here’s what they said Needle Breaks Needle Technology has become so advanced now that Schmetz actually produce a specific needle for actual applications. One of the main problems…

Pressing for Perfect Points Part 1

Achieving perfect points in patchwork is a great goal. The key involves knowing when to break one of the rules that you may have been taught! Beginners are often taught to “always press behind the darker fabric” – to avoid the possibility of a “shadow” showing through the paler fabric. This is still a good,…

What size do I cut triangles?

Having previously looked at sizes for squares and rectangles it is now the turn of triangles, in particular the Half-Square and Quarter-Square triangle units. There is a ‘formula’ for virtually every shape we need to cut for patchwork. Hopefully the following will help you to work out how to rotary cut your triangles. Finished size…

Confused about which needle to use .. this might help!

Jon and Callum from Barnyarns have a lengthy relationship with needles and thread, so when we wanted to learn which needles are best we asked them.  This is the first part of a three part series. The information will interest quilters, machine embroiderers and anyone who sews. Whilst they are talking about the Schmetz brand…

A quick way to check you are sewing a 1/4 inch seam

Now be honest, after spending loads of time piecing fabric to make a quilt top, have you ever found matching your blocks difficult and you realise it is because your measurements were slightly out? It happens to all of us (tell me how I know!). Even if you have that ¼ inch foot so many…

Starters and Enders

A friend of mine has been following advice from Pat Sloan (she is one of the ladies who is responsible for The Splendid Sampler), about using starters and enders. She starts with squares of 2.5 inches, and starts and ends her patchwork sewing with this – this helps to save thread, and makes chain piecing…

Backing Fabric Calculator

Wondering how much fabric you need to back your quilt? – try this one found by Ruth Burns Warren. Twin is what Americans a single bed. Why do they squeeze twins in a single bed? Bit mean surely?! 😉   Related posts: Binding a Mitred Corner Accuracy counts! How to avoid tangles when hand stitching…

Colour & Contrast

Choosing fabrics for a quilt is something that many people would like to do, but lack confidence for. They are not sure why the colours that looked good in the shop don’t seem to give the result they hoped for. Personal taste I would encourage you to make your own choices, and not just to…

What size do I cut squares?

Related posts: Basic Rotary Cutting What size do I cut triangles? Cutting Flying Geese What size do I cut Diamond-in-a-Square units?

In a Nutshell – Template Making

TEMPLATE MAKING These need to be accurately made from either rigid plastic or cardboard. Template plastic is not expensive and worth the investment as the template will last longer and remain accurate. Cardboard can become ‘fluffy’ at the edges with use. Some shops will sell template plastic by the sheet. Check if the templates you…

Rotary Cutting Fabric

When cutting strips from folded fabric (for example if you want a strip from the width of the fabric, but your ruler and mat are too small), make sure that all your folds are parallel, and line up your rule along the foldline, not along the edge of the fabric.       Related posts: Tips…

cut&alter : Half Square Triangle (HST) Tutorial – Part 2

Following on from my previous post, Half Square Triangle Tutorial Part 1, here are picture tutorials on making 8 HSTs at a time or making 1 HST from triangles. 8 AT A TIME HSTs This method can be used if you want 8 HSTs in the same colourway To achieve 2 1/2″ unfinished squares cut…

Self-threading Needles

Dread having to bury all those threads after quilting? A self-threading needle will save you loads of time and it simply won’t be the chore it once was. A ‘self-threading needle’ has a cut made in the top of the eye that allows the thread to be easily pulled into the eye without having to…

Did you know….

Rotary cutters are a very versatile piece of equipment and suit both left and right handed people.  My son is left handed and I know in some circumstances, you can adapt to doing things the right handed way.  Sometimes you can’t.  We have one pair of scissors that just don’t work for him. Wherever possible,…

cut & alter : Half Square Triangle (HST) Tutorial – Part 1

I hope you enjoy the various methods of making these cute little blocks. I love the size of 2 1/2″ squares, they are kind of my go-to size for squares, so the following tutorial is based on that size. 2 AT A TIME HSTs This method can be used if you want 2 HSTs in…

Accuracy counts!

The one thing everyone wants are sharp points and an accurate quilt.   Even the most experienced amongst us strive to achieve this. We can have as many gadgets and gizmos as we like, but at the end of the day it’s attention to detail .. accuracy .. that counts.   Rushing things will not help at…

Basic Rotary Cutting

Using a rotary cutter is a great way of accurately cutting fabric pieces of the shape and size required. It doesn’t take long to learn how to use it – a few tips and a little practice will soon have you cutting with confidence. I’ll start with how to use it for cutting the most…

Mitred Corners

Mitred corners look so classy on a quilt, but they need a bit of care to look good. How to stitch mitred corners Stitch each border onto your quilt starting and stopping at a point 1/4″ in from the end of the centre panel. Secure your stitching here  with a fix stitch or by going…

Binding a Mitred Corner

Ok, so as a beginner the mitred corner may seem daunting but it really is very simple. The best way to learn, I’ve found, is by demonstration so I have prepared the following photos of the process. Study them and then read the following and it should, I hope, make sense. This set of images…

How to prevent your machine from dragging your fabric into the needle plate

A common problem when sewing fine fabrics or small pieces together is that your machine seems to want to ‘eat’ them. Here’s one way of overcoming that issue. Simply place a small piece of paper under the fabric and start stitching. When you have finished, just tear the paper away! 1) Place a small piece…

Working with Triangles

When working with triangles, starching your fabric before cutting can reduce the degree of stretch experienced along the bias. Spray starch is a great addition to the tool box.  Just remember to spray on the back, let it soak in a little and press from the front. Related posts: Quilting Acronyms Colour & Contrast In…

Quilting Acronyms

Do you know you UFO’s from your WIP’s? Quilters have acronyms for everything! BC = bias cut BOB = Beginner’s Only Block (swap) BOM = Block of the Month DF = double fold DSM = Domestic Sewing Machine DWR = Double Wedding Ring FART = Fabric Acquisition Road Trip FIU = Finish It Up FOB…

Sandpaper grip..

Glue a sheet of sandpaper(smooth) to a thick board…this helps to grip your fabric so it doesn’t shift when you draw round templates. Related posts: Don’t chop off the points! Pressing tip How to prevent your machine from dragging your fabric into the needle plate Rotary Cutting Fabric

Rotary safety…

Rotary cutters are invaluable for cutting fabrics,especially multiple layers,but they can cause injury if not used carefully. Get into the habit of clicking the blade close after every cut and never lay it down open! Avoid a trip to A&E…always close your rotary. Related posts: Basic Rotary Cutting Colour & Contrast English Paper Piecing: What…

Tips for Adding Simple Borders by Quilt Sandwich

As a longarm quilter, borders are the most common mistake I encounter. In theory, it should be easy to cut a straight piece of fabric and just sew it to another – Right? WRONG! Its not. The implications for doing this is usually there is far too much border fabric on the quilt. The longarm…

Pressing tip

Do you ever discover a nasty little pleat on a diagonal seam where it hasn’t opened out properly? Here is an ironing tip to avoid this: Related posts: In a Nutshell – Pressing Pressing for Perfect Point: Part 2: Triangles How To Add a ‘Magic’ Binding In a Nutshell – Template Making

Don’t chop off the points!

Hello – I’m Carolyn Gibbs, and my great love is traditional style patchwork and quilting – designing and making things myself, as well as enjoying antique quilts made by others. In my “other life” I teach Chemistry – and this mathematical and technical interest is perhaps why I love the geometry and precision of patchwork.…

How to avoid tangles when hand stitching

I am sure we have all found that, when stitching, applique or quilting by hand, after a while the thread starts to tangle and twist.  This is maddening and means having to stop and untwist the fabric so you can continue. So every few stitches simple rotate the needle between finger and thumb which will…

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Quality Fabrics Online

With both the beginner and the sewing enthusiast in mind, we offer beautiful sewing craft kits with easy to follow step by step instructions. We use only 100% cotton fabric in our kits which is cut by hand. All you need is a pair of scissors as everything else comes with the kits including high…

Quilt Sandwich

Largest selection of extra wide backing fabrics in the UK in online shop. Also run workshops and retreats at our hotel – www.royalhotelbrid.co.uk Longarm quilting service

Howdens Sewing Machines

Specialist sewing machine retailer with extensive knowledge of Bernina and Brother machines and accessories.