Once you have appliquéd all pieces, it is time to add the handle, notice that there is no pattern piece for this. Sew using a straight machine stitch over the line –if you draw one in – and go over it four times. It does not matter if they all do not match. Then using a Zig Zag stitch sew over those lines. You now have a matching handle. You are done.Once you have appliquéd all pieces, it is time to add the handle, notice that there is no pattern piece for this. Sew using a straight machine stitch over the line –if you draw one in – and go over it four times. It does not matter if they all do not match. Then using a Zig Zag stitch sew over those lines. You now have a matching handle. You are done.Once you have appliquéd all pieces, it is time to add the handle, notice that there is no pattern piece for this. Sew using a straight machine stitch over the line –if you draw one in – and go over it four times. It does not matter if they all do not match. Then using a Zig Zag stitch sew over those lines. You now have a matching handle. You are done.When you have been sewing for years as I have, you sometimes forget the little details or the work around. I messed up or rather forgot to add information in my last blog, hence why I am choosing to cover it in this one; Machine appliqué.

This is the second in a series of blocks for my mystery project. Templates here: https://ukqu.co.uk/shop/free-patterns-3/february-blog-templates/

In case, you missed my first block blog for the mystery project: https://ukqu.co.uk/the-cheap-procrastinator-new-you-and-away-to-sew-2/

Some of the information I will repeat each month, as a reminder to those that, like me have a bad memory. It will also aid those who have come to my blog for the first time and would like to join in for this particular block design. All blocks I aim to achieve with the use of second hand cotton fabric found in charity shops or donated from friends and family.

Each block size will start at 11 inches by 11 inches and cut down to – not worked that out yet – inches squared once finished.

Using the fabric you acquired please cut a square 11 inches by 11 inches. Put it to one side and start on the template.

Last month I covered hand sewing. This month I will cover machine sewing. Earlier I mentioned I messed up and missed out some information.

What did I miss out? I said that to save money I would not use interfacing on the back of the appliqués, but what I forgot to mention is what to use instead. For those that did the machine blocks without interfacing I apologise now. Because you may have noticed that, the fabric pulled and got a bit wrinkly. This is because it was not stabilised. To correct this you need to add another piece of fabric underneath the block. It can be any cotton fabric as long as you do not see it through the base block colour you have chosen.

Using your charity shop finds for this week, cut three blocks from the fabric you like the best providing that the shirt will allow this. Using the free template found in my shop – link above- print both a) and b) off. Place the base block over the design of template b and trace off if able to, some fabrics are darker and you will not be able to do this, you may have to cut out and place on top and draw around. I used a Sew Easy pen to do this – information about this is in my product review – here: https://ukqu.co.uk/sashiko-starter-kit-easy-sew-product-review-denise-inkson-aka-cheap-procrastinator/ .

You of course do not have to do this, I do because I would like all the blocks to look similar. You could just have them all random instead, that is what is great about this project, the randomness of it.

Once done cut out your template pieces from template a – found on the link above- remembering to use your paper, not fabric scissors.

Let me introduce you to a new item for your sewing kit – this is a bonus not a must have – 505 spray. This is a temporary adhesive spray for fabrics and papers. Instructions are on the can and it can come in other brands. It is available from good craft shops and an online retailer has it listed from £7 – £15 with a choice of sellers and other brands.

You will need a base layer of something to spray the fabric on – I use a sheet of greaseproof paper – it helps stop the spray from going where you do not want it.

With a piece of your chosen fabric – charity sourced hopefully- spray it finger press down, and then add another piece of fabric and do the same, once more with a third piece of fabric, spray again and apply the piece of template you wish to use. Cut through all the layers. Peel apart and apply to the base blocks.

You will need to stabilise the fabric before you machine sew. I used the same fabric as the base block and stuck it on the back so it covered the area where the bucket was.

Once you have the first layer, in my case the base of the bucket – using a sewing machine – Zig Zag stitch around the edge of the bucket.

You do not need a fancy machine to do this as long as it can go forward and backwards and has a Zig Zag stitch you will be fine. It is wise to do a test stitch first so you can – if your machine allows it – to adjust the Zig Zag width. The thread for the top and bobbins can either be matching or contrasting.

When you have sewn your bucket, trim excess fabric from around the edge of the back, now appliqué the spade, I have placed the fabric at wrong angles to show you the contrast for the spade on the back of the block.

Once you have appliquéd all pieces, it is time to add the handle, notice that there is no pattern piece for this. Sew using a straight machine stitch over the line –if you draw one in – and go over it four times. It does not matter if they all do not match. Then using a Zig Zag stitch sew over those lines. You now have a matching handle. You are done.

 

Next month I aim to cover reverse appliqué so you will need to source some nice bold patterned pieces of fabric

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