Have you used Pinterest before? It’s such a great tool for quilting, I promise!

If you’ve not ventured into the world of pinterest before then it really is worth a look. Pinterest is a visual bookmarking tool that will soon become a valuable item in your quilting toolkit!

In essence you create ‘boards’ to store all of the lovely and useful things that you find online. You can call the boards whatever you like and you can pin links or images to those boards for reference at a later date. It really is a super way of organizing and storing your patterns, inspiration, tips and techniques.

Below you’ll find my suggestions as to how you might like to use Pinterest to support you in your quilty life.

TUTORIALS

Pinterest is a great way of storing links to all of your tutorials. If you are a tutorial hoarder like me you could even create different boards for different skills. Here are some ideas to get you started:

– Hand Quilting Skills
– Binding Techniques
– Machine Quilting Designs and Tips
– Block Construction Techniques/Cheat Sheets
– Colour Theory
– FPP Techniques
– EPP Techniques
– Applique Techniques

INSPIRATION AND QUILT GOALS

You know when you see a fabulous quilt and just don’t want to forget it? Pin all those amazing and inspirational quilts and make yourself a virtual quilt exhibition that you can wander through at any time from the comfort of your own home!

MOOD BOARDS

Sometimes an idea forms in your head fully formed and sometimes you have a theme in mind, but want to spend some time working on the finer details. Pinterest really comes into its own as you can save all sorts of images to get your creative juices flowing!

SECRET BOARDS

Did you know that you can also make a board private? So useful when you are not ready to share you ideas with the world or planning your inspiration for your next quilt competition entry that you don’t want anyone to see until it has been judged. You pin information in the normal way, but in the board settings you mark the

Tempted? If so, then here’s a quick setup guide to get you started:

HOW TO SET UP A PINTEREST ACCOUNT (on your laptop or PC*)

When you first arrive on the Pinterest site you’ll be greeted with a landing page asking you to create a username and password. Alternatively you can log in via your facebook or google account.

You are then asked to choose 5 areas of interest. This is so that Pinterest can create a newsfeed for you as a starting point. Your newsfeed will change over time the more you pin so don’t be too worried. I selected Sewing, Knitting and Crochet, Christmas Crafts, Design and Home Decor

In this final step you can opt to add a pinterest button to your menu bar which makes it easy to pin images from off pinterest/normal websites.

So here you have it, your very first newsfeed

WHAT NEXT?

Find a pin you like and pin it! To pin a pin hover over it and you will see a ‘Save’ button appear.

Click on it and you will be taken to the next page where it asks you to create a new board or add it to an existing board. I found a pin and saved it to a new board that I called Colour Theory.

Next click on your profile name in the top right hand corner of the page. This will take you to your profile page. Now you can see any boards you have created and the pins within each board.

 

If you hover over a board a little pencil icon will appear. If you click on it you can, amongst other things, change the name of the board and you can change the status to secret of you so wish.

So there you have it, the very basics of setting up and using pinterest. Under ‘Settings’ you can enhance your profile page with a photo, a bio and link to your website if you have one, along with your other social media accounts. You can also do fun things such as creating group boards.

A WORD OF WARNING…..

Pinterest can be very addictive and many an hour can be wasted looking at all of the lovely pins out there. Don’t forget to step away and sew something every now and then!

*Pinterest has an app for Android and Apple which is super easy to use and set up. The set up varies a little from above, but is broadly the same.

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